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2014–15 Report on plans and priorities

Preface

Table of contents

The original version was signed by
The Honourable Tony Clement, PC, MP
President of the Treasury Board


Commissioner's message

Photograph of Karen Shepherd

I am pleased to present the 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities for the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying. My mandate is threefold: maintaining a registry of lobbyists that is accessible to Canadians; fostering awareness of the requirements of the Lobbying Act through outreach; and ensuring compliance with the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct.

The Lobbying Act is based on the premise that lobbying is legitimate and must be conducted in a transparent manner. The Registry of Lobbyists is the primary instrument for the public disclosure of lobbying activities at the federal level. The Registry of Lobbyists allows Canadians to know who is lobbying federal public office holders and about which topics. Oral and arranged communications with designated public office holders must be disclosed on a monthly basis. I believe that when monthly communication reports are filed late, transparency is hindered. Therefore, this year my Office will focus on improving the notifications that lobbyists see when they file reports late, and on improving outreach materials to emphasize reporting deadlines.

I believe that awareness and understanding of the requirements of the Lobbying Act are key to compliance. My staff and I regularly meet with lobbyists, elected officials and their staff, and senior managers of the federal public service, and other interested stakeholders, to ensure the requirements of the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct are known and understood. This year my Office will implement enhanced compliance verification activities to ensure that those who may need to register understand the requirements and are able to comply.

In 2013–14, I launched a consultation to help inform my decision as to whether the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct should be amended. Analysis of submissions is underway, and I intend to report the results of the consultation in early 2014–15. If needed, a revised Code will be developed. A second consultation would then be launched to ensure that the proposed changes reflect the ethical standards expected of lobbyists.

I remain committed to ensuring that both the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct are administered and enforced in a way that fosters transparency and encourages high ethical standards in federal lobbying activities. I look forward to the challenges and opportunities that the coming year will bring.

Karen E. Shepherd
Commissioner of Lobbying


Section I: Organizational expenditure overview

Organizational profile

Deputy Head: Karen E. Shepherd

Year established: 2006

Main legislative authorities: Lobbying Act, R.S.C., 1985, c. 44 (4th Supp.) Justice Canada website

Other: The Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying supports the Commissioner of Lobbying, who is an independent Agent of Parliament.

Organizational context

Raison d'être

The Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying (OCL) supports the Commissioner of Lobbying, the Agent of Parliament responsible for the administration of the Lobbying Act (the Act). The legislation seeks to improve transparency and accountability regarding communications between lobbyists and federal public office holders and increase the confidence of Canadians in the integrity of government decision-making.

Responsibilities

The Commissioner of Lobbying is responsible for the administration of the Lobbying Act. The authority of the Commissioner is derived from the Act.

  • The mandate of the Commissioner is threefold:
    • Establish and maintain the Registry of Lobbyists, which contains and makes public the information disclosed by lobbyists;
    • Develop and implement educational programs to foster public awareness of the requirements of the Act; and
    • Undertake administrative reviews and investigations to ensure compliance with the Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct (the Code).

Under the Act, the Commissioner of Lobbying has the authority to grant exemptions to former designated public office holders who are subject to a five-year prohibition on lobbying activities.

The Commissioner reports annually to Parliament on the administration of the Act and the Code. At the end of any investigation, the Commissioner is also required to submit a Report on Investigations to Parliament, to present her findings, conclusions, and the reasons for her conclusions.

Strategic outcome and program alignment architecture

  • 1. Strategic Outcome: Transparency and accountability in the lobbying of public office holders contribute to confidence in the integrity of government decision-making.
    • 1.1 Program: Registration of Lobbyists
    • 1.2 Program: Education and Research
    • 1.3 Program: Reviews and Investigations under the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct
    • Internal Services

Organizational priorities

Organizational priorities
Priority TypeFootnote 1 Program
Improve the timeliness of monthly communication reports filed by lobbyists New

Registration of Lobbyists

Education and Research

Description
  • Why is this a priority?
    • The Lobbying Act requires registered lobbyists to file a report when they have an oral and arranged communication with a designated public office holder. These reports are due no later than 15 days after the end of the month in which the communication took place. Failure to file within these timelines is an offence under the Act.
    • This disclosure requirement ensures that Canadians know who communicated with which high-level decision makers, when the communication took place, and the topic of the communication.
    • The Commissioner believes that when lobbyists file monthly communication reports late transparency is hindered. In 2012–13, 13% of these reports were filed late. Ensuring that lobbyists are aware of the timelines prescribed in the Act is an important first step towards improving timeliness.
  • What are the plans for meeting this priority?
    • Implement improved notification in the Lobbyists Registration System to ensure that registered lobbyists are aware of the timelines for submitting monthly communication reports.
    • Educate all lobbyists through outreach products and sessions about the requirements to file within prescribed timelines.
Priority Type Program
Report the results of the consultation on the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct Previously committed to Education and Research
Description
  • Why is this a priority?
    • Code revisions are the responsibility of the Commissioner.
    • The Commissioner launched a consultation on the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct in 2013–14 to help her determine whether the Code should be revised.
    • Reporting on the results of the consultation is important in order to communicate the feedback heard from stakeholders.
  • What are the plans for meeting this priority?
    • The Commissioner will publish a report about the results of the consultation.
    • If the Commissioner determines that changes are required, a revised Code will be developed and a consultation process will be launched on the revised version.
Priority Type Program
Improve efficiency by operationalizing a new automated case management system Previously committed to Reviews and Investigations under the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists Code of Conduct
Description
  • Why is this a priority?
    • An automated case management system will improve efficiencies in compliance file management. It will also ensure that the results of reviews and investigations are communicated on a timely basis.
  • What are the plans for meeting this priority?
    • The OCL will begin installation of a new case management system in 2013–14, to be completed in 2014–15. It will be configured to meet the OCL’s work flow and security requirements.
    • Policies and procedures will be developed to support the efficient use of the new system.
    • Files from current (i.e., non-automated) case management system will be transferred to the new system.
    • OCL staff who will work with the automated case management system will be trained.
Priority Type Program
Implement enhanced compliance verification processes. Previously committed to Reviews and Investigations under the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists Code of Conduct
Description
  • Why is this a priority?
    • Transparency is enhanced when those who are lobbying federal public office holders are in compliance with the Lobbying Act. It is important that measures be taken to ensure that those who may be lobbying are aware of the requirements of the legislation and the Code. In 2013–14, the Commissioner committed to developing a more strategic approach to compliance verification. This year, several new activities will be implemented to reach a broader range of potential lobbyists.
  • What are the plans for meeting this priority?

    Compliance activities include:

    • Ongoing: compliance assessments of individuals, organizations and corporations who have previously been found to have been in breach of the Act; media monitoring; verifications with designated public office holders of information disclosed by lobbyists in monthly communication reports.
    • New: sectoral analysis and issues-based analysis; audits of information in the Registry.
Priority Type Program
Enhance the security and control of OCL’s compliance files and business processes by implementing a segregated network New

Reviews and Investigations under the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists Code of Conduct

Internal Services

Description
  • Why is this a priority?
    • OCL currently operates according to acceptable standards in terms of file protection. However, a segregated network will be implemented to enhance its secure environment. This will: better protect the information contained in compliance files; allow for ease of internal transfer of files in a secure way through a segregated mail server; and create a development environment for OCL to more closely manage the Lobbyists Registration System.
  • What are the plans for meeting this priority?
    • The OCL will continue to train IT staff to ensure that proper competencies are in place to allow the segregated network to be managed effectively on an ongoing basis.
    • The OCL will develop internal policies and practices around the use of the segregated network, to ensure the security and integrity of the information it contains.
Priority Type Program
Explore opportunities to further collaborate on the delivery of OCL’s corporate services with other Agents of Parliament and other federal institutions, while maintaining the independence of the Office New Internal Services
Description
  • Why is this a priority?
    • OCL uses service agreements whenever possible to deliver enabling services such as IT, human resources, and financial services. Agreements with service providers are negotiated and monitored to ensure that practices and services are consistent with OCL requirements, standards, and internal controls. At the same time, OCL, as the organization supporting an independent Agent of Parliament, must consider and preserve the independence of the Office.
  • What are the plans for meeting this priority?
    • OCL will continue discussions with counterparts in the Offices of other Agents of Parliament regarding collaborative opportunities.
    • OCL will continue to actively participate in many interdepartmental fora, including: Heads of Federal Agencies (HFA), Small Agencies Administrators’ Network (SAAN), Small Agencies Finance Action Group (SAFAG), and Heads of Information Management and Heads of Information Technology of Small Agencies (HOIT) with a view to working collaboratively whenever possible.
    • The OCL will continue to review its service agreements and make improvements where possible to ensure that the organization is getting the best value for money.

Risk analysis

Key risks

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Information Technology Security

This risk was identified as a result of the Internal Audit of the Lobbyists Registration System conducted in 2012–13. This risk was also documented in the Corporate Risk Profile, updated in 2013–14.

To address this risk, the OCL will begin the installation of a segregated network in 2013–14, to be completed in 2014–15. Policies and practices around the use of the network will be developed.

Reviews and Investigations under the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct

Internal Services

Integrity and accessibility of the Lobbyists Registration System

This risk was identified in the 2012–13 RPP.

It is important for data integrity that information be posted in the Registry in a timely basis. The OCL will improve the integrity of the information contained in the Registry by educating lobbyists about the timelines for submitting monthly communication reports, with a view to improving the timeliness of disclosures by lobbyists.

The OCL will keep the documentation of the Registry's processes evergreen to ensure long-term integrity of the Registry. Creating a development environment for the Lobbyists Registration System that is on a segregated network will allow the OCL to update, mine and report on Registry data internally.

Registration of Lobbyists

Education and Research

Lobbyists fail to comply with the Lobbying Act because they do not understand the requirements

This risk was documented in the Corporate Risk Profile, updated in 2013–14.

To address this risk, the OCL is implementing a more strategic approach to compliance verification. Advisory letters will be issued to ensure that those who should register understand the requirements of the Act and register if required. In addition, the OCL will focus efforts on raising awareness of the timelines for filing monthly communication reports prescribed in the Lobbying Act.

Registration of Lobbyists

Education and Research

Reviews and Investigations under the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct

In managing the information technology (IT) infrastructure that supports the Registry of Lobbyists and other systems, a number of risks related to IT security have been identified. Potential implications for such risks include a loss of confidence in the information contained in the Registry. The OCL continues to strengthen its management accountability framework to mitigate these risks, and the introduction of a segregated network will enhance the security environment in two key areas: protection of information relating to compliance files, and facilitation of the development of the Lobbyists Registration System.

The integrity of the Registry and its accessibility to Canadians are paramount to ensuring transparency. The OCL reviews and approves lobbyists' registrations and ensures that the Registry is available with minimum system interruptions. The introduction of a segregated network will allow the OCL to better and more efficiently plan for Registry improvements, within a secure development space.

In 2012–13, 13% of monthly communication reports were filed late. This may be a result of registered individuals, organizations and corporations not being aware of disclosure and timeliness requirements. Likewise, individuals, organizations and corporations may fail to register because they are not aware that the Lobbying Act applies to them. The OCL will put in place measures to improve notifications in the Registry so that lobbyists who file monthly communication reports late are made aware that they have done so. At the same time, outreach products will be reviewed and updated to ensure that the importance of adhering to the prescribed timeline is emphasized. The OCL will also increase the number of advisory letters sent to potential registrants to ensure that those at risk of non-compliance are made aware of the requirements of the Act. This will be achieved by implementing more strategic compliance verification activities.

An Audit and Evaluation Committee (AEC) was established in 2009 as an independent advisory committee to the Commissioner of Lobbying. The AEC provides objective advice and recommendations to the Commissioner regarding the sufficiency, quality and results of assurance on the adequacy and functioning of the organization's risk management, control and governance frameworks and processes (including accountability and auditing systems). The AEC meets four times a year.

Planned expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending—dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
4,432,300 4,685,142 4,432,300 4,432,300
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents — FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
28 28 28
Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2011–12
Expenditures
2012–13
Expenditures
2013–14
Forecast Spending
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome: Transparency and accountability in the lobbying of public office holders contribute to confidence in the integrity of government decision-making.
Registration of Lobbyists 1,037,644 1,124,001 894,800 824,989 824,989 824,989 824,989
Education and Research 939,571 924,150 753,443 780,733 800,084 780,733 780,733
Reviews and Investigations under the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct 1,106,171 1,019,962 1,226,329 1,137,784 1,143,118 1,137,784 1,137,784
Strategic Outcome Subtotal 3,083,386 3,068,113 2,874,572 2,743,506 2,768,191 2,743,506 2,743,506
Internal Services
Subtotal
1,778,204 1,677,201 1,689,644 1,688,794 1,916,951 1,688,794 1,688,794
Total 4,861,590 4,745,314 4,564,216 4,432,300 4,685,142 4,432,300 4,432,300

The OCL's spending has remained fairly constant over the last few years. The decrease in expenditures in 2012–13 compared to 2011–12 was mainly due to the payments incurred for termination and severance liquidation payments in fiscal year 2011–12.

The variance between the 2012–13 Expenditures and the 2013–14 Forecast Spending is primarily due to a 5% (or $230K) budget reduction announced in Budget 2012.

The difference in planned spending for 2014–15 compared to future years is the result of the anticipated lapse to be carried forward from 2013–14 of approximately $150K and the reimbursement of maternity leave expenditures. Otherwise, the planned spending for future years is expected to remain constant.

Alignment to government of Canada outcomes

2014–15 Planned Spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending Area
(dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2014–15
Planned Spending
Transparency and accountability in the lobbying of public office holders contribute to confidence in the integrity of government decision-making 1.1 Registration of Lobbyists Government Affairs An accountable, transparent, and responsive government 824,989
1.2 Education and Research Government Affairs An accountable, transparent, and responsive government 800,084
1.3 Reviews and Investigations under the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct Government Affairs An accountable, transparent, and responsive government 1,143,118
Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs
Social Affairs
International Affairs
Government Affairs 2,768,191

Departmental spending trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Description of Spending Trend Graph

This graph shows the spending trend from fiscal years 2011–12 to 2016–17. It shows the variance in a bar chart format between the 2011–12 to 2012–13 Actual Spending, the 2013–14 Forecast Spending and the 2014–15 to 2016–17 Planned Spending. The financial information is shown in dollars in increments of 1,000,000 starting from 0 up to 6,000,000.

Departmental Spending Trend (in dollars)
Actual Spending Forecast Spending Planned Spending
2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
4,861,590 4,745,314 4,564,216 4,685,142 4,432,300 4,432,300

The figure above illustrates the spending trend for the OCL from 2011–12 to 2016–17.

Actual spending corresponds to total expenditures as published in the Public Accounts of Canada. The forecast spending reflects the expected expenditures for 2013–14. The 2014–15 planned spending reflects the resources approved through Main Estimates, and the anticipated lapse to be carried forward from 2013–14 and maternity leave expenditures. The planned spending for 2015–16 and 2016–17 reflects the approved resources.

The actual spending for 2012–13 and the forecast spending for 2013–14 show a decrease compared to the 2011–12 actual spending. The decrease is due mainly to the 5% budget reduction of ($230K) announced in Budget 2012.

The variance in the 2014–15 planned spending and future years is the result of the anticipated lapse to be carried forward from 2013–14 of approximately $150K and the reimbursement of maternity leave expenditures. Otherwise, the planned spending for future years is expected to remain constant.

Estimates by vote

For information on the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada's organizational appropriations, please see the 2014–15 Main Estimates publication Treasury Board Secretariat website.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2013–16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Environment Canada website (FSDS), tabled on , guides the Government of Canada's 2013–16 sustainable development activities. The FSDS articulates Canada's federal sustainable development priorities for a period of three years, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA).

The Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying also ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA). An SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

Section II: Analysis of programs by strategic outcome

Strategic outcome

Transparency and accountability in the lobbying of public office holders contribute to confidence in the integrity of government decision-making.

Program 1.1: Registration of Lobbyists

Description

Lobbying the federal government is a legitimate activity but it must be done transparently. The Lobbying Act requires that individuals who are paid to lobby public office holders must disclose certain details of their lobbying activities. The Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying approves lobbyists' registrations and makes them available for searching in an electronic registry that is accessible on the Internet.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
824,989 824,989 824,989 824,989
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
7 7 7
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Lobbyists can register in accordance with the requirements of the Lobbying Act. Percentage of registrations that are processed within 3 business days 100%
Canadians have access to information about lobbyists and lobbying activities. Percentage of time the Registry of Lobbyists is available to Canadians 95-98%
Planning highlights
  • In order to achieve the expected results, the OCL plans to undertake the following activities:
    • The system documentation for the Lobbyists Registration System has been reviewed and updated, and it will be kept evergreen to ensure continuity of the Registry.
    • Notifications to lobbyists in the Lobbyists Registration System will be improved, so that when they file a monthly communication report outside of prescribed deadlines, they are informed that doing so constitutes a breach of the Act.

Program 1.2: Education and research

Description

The Office develops and implements educational and research programs to foster awareness of the requirements of the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct. The primary audiences for programs are lobbyists, their clients and public office holders.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
780,733 800,084 780,733 780,733
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
7 7 7
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Lobbyists, their clients, public office holders, and the public are aware of the requirements of the Act. Awareness of the Act on the part of lobbyists, their clients, public office holders, and the public is medium to high. 80%
Planning highlights
  • In order to achieve the expected results, the OCL plans to undertake the following activities:
    • This year the OCL will develop tools that will allow stakeholders to provide feedback on whether outreach activities raised their awareness of the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct. This data collection will improve the OCL's ability to evaluate the program in the future.
    • In order to reduce the rate of late monthly communication reports filed by lobbyists, outreach products and tools will be revised to emphasize filing deadlines.
    • The results of the consultation on the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct will be communicated in a report made public on the OCL's website and shared with Parliament. Should the Commissioner decide to amend the Code, a revised Code will be developed and a consultation will be launched to ensure that it reflects the ethical standards expected of lobbyists.

Program 1.3: Reviews and investigations under the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct

Description

The Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying validates information provided by registered lobbyists to ensure accuracy. Allegations of non-registration or misconduct by lobbyists are reviewed and formal investigations are carried out when required.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
1,137,784 1,143,118 1,137,784 1,137,784
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
8 8 8
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Suspected, alleged or known breaches of the Lobbying Act and the Lobbyists' Code of Conduct are reviewed or investigated and appropriate measures taken to ensure compliance. Percentage of suspected, alleged or known breaches of the Act or Code that are subject to review or investigation. 100 %
Exemptions from the five-year prohibition are granted or denied in a manner consistent with the purposes of the Lobbying Act Percentage of exemption reviews completed to the point of the letter of intent within 60 days 100 %
Information contained in monthly communication reports submitted to the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying is accurate and complete Percentage of monthly communication reports that are found accurate 90–95 %
Planning highlights
  • In order to achieve the expected results, the OCL plans to undertake the following activities:
    • Implement the compliance verification activities identified in 2013–14, and increase the number of advisory letters sent to potential registrants.
    • Operationalize a new automated case management system which will begin installation in 2013–14, to be completed in 2014–15. This automated case management system will improve on the case management system currently in place, by allowing for efficiencies in the distribution of compliance files, and in tracking workflow. These efficiencies will improve the Commissioner's ability to report results of investigations in a timely manner. Implementation of the new system will include the development of operational policies and practices, as well as training for staff.
    • Continue to review applications from the five-year prohibition on lobbying in a manner consistent with established service standards.

Internal services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Given the mandate of the OCL to develop and implement educational programs to foster public awareness of the requirements of the Lobbying Act, Communications Services are not included in Internal Services, but rather form part of the Education and Research program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
1,688,794 1,916,951 1,688,794 1,688,794
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
6 6 6
Planning highlights

The OCL will continue to strengthen its management accountability framework, including planning and reporting instruments such as its Performance Measurement Framework and Strategy, Integrated Business and Human Resources Plan, Information Management/Information Technology Strategic Plan, and Security and Business Continuity Plans. The development of a Multi-Year Evaluation Plan will allow the OCL to scope its future evaluative work, including developing data collection tools and readying the education and research program for evaluation.

  • The OCL plans to undertake the following activity:
    • Implement a segregated network to better protect information relating to compliance files, as well as facilitate the development of the Lobbyists Registration System.

Section III: Supplementary information

Future-oriented statement of operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations presented in this subsection is intended to serve as a general overview of the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying's operations. The forecasted financial information on expenses and revenues are prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the future-oriented statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of this report are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts will differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying's website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31 (dollars)
Financial Information Estimated Results 2013–14 Planned Results 2014–15 Change
Total expenses 5,550,695 5,692,293 141,598
Total revenues
Net cost of operations 5,550,695 5,692,293 141,598

The increase from the 2013–14 estimated results to the 2014–15 planned results represents 2.5% of the total expenses. This is due primarily to an increase in personnel costs related to ratification of collective agreements.

List of supplementary information tables

Tax expenditures and evaluations report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Department of Finance website publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational contact information

Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying of Canada
Tel: 613-957-2760
Fax: 613-957-3078
Email: questionslobbying@lobbycanada.gc.ca

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